Death-Obituary Kitten Natividad Death, Movie Star In Russ Meyer’s Bawdy World, Dies At 74

Death-Obituary Kitten Natividad Death, Movie Star In Russ Meyer’s Bawdy World, Dies At 74

Kitten Natividad Death, Obituary – Kitten Natividad, brought audacity and ample physical attributes to some of the final films of Russ Meyer, whose over-the-top sexploitation movies acquired a certain cachet in some quarters and influenced John Waters, Quentin Tarantino, and other directors, passed away on September 24 in Los Angeles. Meyer was a director whose over-the-top sexploitation movies acquired a certain cachet in some quarters and influenced John Waters, and Quentin Tar It was the year 74.

According to her sister Eva Natividad Garcia, the cause of death was complications related to kidney failure. Ms. Natividad had very little experience in the film industry and was working at the time as a go-go dancer and stripper when she met Mr. Meyer in the middle of the 1970s. At the time, Mr. Meyer was getting close to the conclusion of his infamous movie career.

Read also; Peter Hort Obituary, New York Collector, Dies at 51

In the 1960s, Mr. Meyer, who passed away in 2004, became known for making ludicrous films such as “Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!” and “Vixen.” The majority of these films had absurd stories and ravenous naked women with enormous breasts. Mr. Meyer passed away in 2004.

Mr. Meyer was already editing his 1976 feature film, “Up!,” when he decided to add a part for a dancer who had been suggested to him by an actress from one of his earlier films, as stated in Jimmy McDonough’s “Big Bosoms and Square Jaws: The Biography of Russ Meyer, King of the Sex Film,” which was published in 2005. According to this, Mr. Meyer was the “King of the Sex Film.” He approached the film critic Roger Ebert, who was also one of the writers for the movie “Up!,” and asked him to come up with some lines of dialogue for a character he called the Greek Chorus.

“It doesn’t matter what she says,” Mr. Ebert recalled Mr. Meyer says. “She just has to say something. And it should sound kinda poetic.” The newcomer was Ms. Natividad, and what Mr. Ebert wrote for her was paraphrased by the Imagist poet Hilda Doolittle.

“Armed with Ebert’s lofty gobbledygook,” Mr. McDonough wrote, “Meyer took the New Girl out in the woods, stripped her down, and made her recite all this complex, arcane narration while she hung from trees and hid in bushes.” Mr. Meyer also fell for Ms. Natividad, who was married at the time, and they began a relationship that lasted for the rest of the 1970s. And he made her the star of his next movie, which would be his final feature film: “Beneath the Valley of the Ultra-Vixens” (1979).

The film is frequently referred to as Mr. Meyer’s take on the classic film “Our Town.” For instance, it featured an onscreen narrator who introduced himself as “The Man From Small Town U.S.A.” The character that Ms. Natividad portrays is a woman who has sexual frustration as a result of her husband’s obsession with oral sex. The screenplay for the movie, which Mr. Meyer and Mr. Ebert collaborated on, did not receive a lot of positive feedback from critics.

Mr. Ebert’s television partner on the film review show that was then known as “Sneak Previews” was Gene Siskel of The Chicago Tribune. Siskel wrote that Mr. Meyer’s “Vixen,” which was released in 1968, had been “an enjoyable nudie film because it featured the first joyfully aggressive woman we’d seen in a skin flick.” However, he continued by saying, “Meyer has not matured in the past ten years; if anything, he has deteriorated.”

The song “Beneath the Valley” would turn out to be Meyer’s swan song, although he would always hold a soft spot in his heart for it. During an interview he gave in 1999 to the publication Pop Cult, he referred to Ms. Natividad as his favorite leading lady. Full Story

Death-Obituary Kitten Natividad Death, Movie Star In Russ Meyer’s Bawdy World, Dies At 74