Joni Mitchell Death and Obituary, Canadian-American Singer, Songwriter and Painter Joni Mitchell is Dead, Cause of Death

Joni Mitchell

Joni Mitchell Death and Obituary, Canadian-American Singer, Songwriter and Painter Joni Mitchell is Dead, Cause of Death

In 1996, Wally Breese, creator of JoniMitchell.com, started a biographical series that was published on the site in 1998. Planned as an ongoing and complete project, his untimely death in 2000 ended his goal. In 2012, JoniMitchell.com commissioned longtime Joni fan Mark Scott to create a sequel to the project. Because of all the new information that has emerged over the past 15 years, Mark has decided to start over with a new biographical series. We present both works (previously) in their entirety here.

Roberta Joan “Joni” Mitchell CC (née Anderson; born November 7, 1943) is a Canadian-American singer-songwriter and painter. Drawing inspiration from folk, pop, rock, classical and jazz, Mitchell’s songs often reflect social and philosophical ideals, as well as her feelings about romance, femininity, disillusionment and joy.

She has received many honors, including ten Grammy Awards and an inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997. Rolling Stone called her “one of the greatest songwriters of all time”,[1] AllMusic declared, “If the dust settles, Joni Mitchell is considered the most important and influential recording artist of the late 20th century”.

Mitchell began singing in small nightclubs in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and throughout Western Canada before expanding into nightclubs in Toronto, Ontario. She moved to the United States and began touring in 1965. Some of her original songs (“Urge for Going”, “Chelsea Morning”, “Both Sides, Now”, “The Circle Game”) were recorded by other folk singers.

She signed to Reprise Records in 1968 and recorded her debut album, Song to the Seagulls. Mitchell settled in Southern California and defined an era and a generation with popular songs like “Big Yellow Taxi” and “Woodstock.” Their 1971 album Blue is often cited as one of the greatest albums of all time.

It was ranked as the 30th greatest album of all time on Rolling Stone’s 2003 list of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time”, Moved to No. 3 in the 2020 edition. In 2000, The New York Times selected Blue as one of 25 albums that “depict the turning point and high point of 20th century pop music.” NPR’s 2017 list of the greatest albums made by women Lieutenant will rate Blue as number one.